Senator James Risch

(R-ID), Senate, United States

Senator James Risch, currently serving a second term as Idaho's 28th Senator, holds a longstanding commitment to public service and a passion for good government. Known for "pragmatic decision-making," Risch is what his peers call a "no-nonsense, get-the-job-done leader" with more than four decades of experience in elected office. He has been recognized by the National Journal as the “Most Conservative” Senator in the United States Senate.

 

Risch brings his pragmatic, results-focused approach to governance to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, where he serves as chairman for the 116th Congress. As the lead Republican on the committee, Risch is focused on protecting the security and interests of the American people, in addition to continuing to advance U.S. prosperity and leadership in the world.

 

In addition to the Foreign Relations Committee, Risch is a member of the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee, having served as the committee’s chairman during the 115th Congress. He also serves on the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, giving Idaho a voice in legislation that dramatically shapes the West, and on the Select Committee on Intelligence and the Select Committee on Ethics.

 

Senator Risch was elected to the United States Senate in November of 2008, after serving as Idaho state senator, lieutenant governor, and Idaho’s 31st governor. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Forestry from the University of Idaho, and a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Idaho, College of Law. He was a small business owner, a rancher and farmer, and senior partner in the Risch Goss Insinger Gustavel law firm at the time of his election to the U.S. Senate.

 

Senator Risch and his wife Vicki have been married for 50 years. Their commitment to Idaho and their work together earned them the distinction of being selected as Idaho's Healthy Marriage Ambassadors in 2007. They have three married sons and nine grandchildren. They live on a ranch outside of Boise and maintain an apartment in Washington, D.C.

© 2020 by the Center for European Policy Analysis